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ANTOINE BEUGER : NOW IS THE MOMENT TO LEARN HOPE
cd

Now Is The Moment To Learne Hope

Loren Chasse : bell
Brandon Conway : classical guitar
Sage Fisher : harp
Matt Hannafin : bowed crotale
Branic Howard : bowed guitar
Evan Spacht : alto trombone

Now Is the Moment to Learn Hope was recorded and mastered by Branic Howard at the Portland Garment Factory, a woman-owned, certified zero-waste manufacturing studio in Portland, Oregon, USA. Production assistance by Robert Waldorf.

The Extradition Ensemble is a fluid group of musicians associated with Portland’s Extradition Series, which presents programs of 20th- and 21st-century experimental music exploring purity, space, sound, and silence. http://www.extradition-series.com

Sleeve notes : Guy Peters.  Layout : Rutger Zuydervelt

“The other piece by Beuger is something different. First of all, it is a piece for an ensemble, unlike many of his solo and duo works. It is also not in the same league of quietness; far from it, as this is quite an audible piece of music. It is performed by the Extradition Ensemble, “a fluid group of musicians associated with Portland’s Extradition Series, which presents programs of 20th and 21st-century experimental music exploring purity, space, sound and silence”. The only name I recognized was Loren Chasse, who plays a bell here. Other instruments for this piece includes classical guitar, harp, bowed crotale, bowed guitar and alto trombone. It was recorded at the Portland Garment Factory, of which the cover says, “a women-owned, certified zero-waste
manufacturing studio”. When listing all the instruments I was surprised there was no piano, as it surely sounded there was one present here. The occasional returning bang sounded like a piano, but surely is Chasse’s bell then. Also, there is the sound of water, like it is recorded in a cave; no doubt that is a field recording. The work, forty-seven minutes, is slow with long strokes of the bowed
instruments and the alto trombone, whereas the bell, harp and acoustic guitar may play that bang, which might not be in ‘sync’; the intervals don’t seem regular, but I was never good at counting. It is a peaceful composition that reminded me of recent David Jackman music (now, there’s a thought for Wandelweiser label!), but then not as strictly organised. The music of Beuger here is a rather fluid (pun intended) and less intense. An excellent piece!” Vital Weekly – The Netherlands